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The Three T’s of Anti-Bullying

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With the new school year rolling in, there is a lot on parents’ minds.

  • Does my child have enough pencils, notebooks, and folders?
  • Did I remember to pack their lunch today?
  • I wonder what kind of papers I’ll have to sign when they get home.

One thing that parents might forget to think about is bullying. Whether your child gets bullied, witnesses bullying, or is the bully, this is something that needs to be addressed as early as possible. It is important for parents to teach their kids how to communicate with bullies and how not to accidentally become one. Luckily, there is a simple three-step system for communicating with bullies, which will help your child understand the importance of the subject.

The Three T’s: Talk, Tell, Tackle.

The first T in this anti-bullying process is “talk.” The first time a child gets bullied, he or she should simply talk to the bully and let them know that their words or actions hurt them. Children can be brutally honest, and sometimes children simply do not know that what they’re saying is hurtful. The first T, talk, teaches kids how to have a conversation with someone about their differences. The problem can easily be nipped in the bud at this stage.

The second T is “tell.” Let’s say a bully walked up to your son and started making fun of his glasses. Your son did the right thing and spoke to the bully about how his words are hurtful, but the bully continually makes of your son’s glasses day after day. At this point, the right thing to do would be telling a trusted adult. This could be you (the parents), his teacher, the principal, or a school counselor. That adult can then mediate the issue and hopefully stop the hurtful words.

The third T is “tackle.” This may sound violent, but the real objective here is for your child to show the bully that he or she is in control of the situation. If the bully from the previous example continues making fun of your son’s glasses and begins physically pushing him or hitting him, we believe it is then okay to tackle. Tackling means taking the bully to the ground, sitting on top of him, and asking him to stop. Once your child establishes that he is not scared of the bully, the problem will most likely end.

The most important thing to take away from this is teaching your child not to retaliate with violence on the first offence. It’s important to teach them how to communicate with their words and have a conversation about differing opinions. The only time that it’s okay to skip “Talk” and “Tell” is if your child is being physically attacked. Then it is okay for he or she to go straight to “Tackle.”

And, there you have it. Although these three steps sound easy, it is something that children need to learn and practice. The best way to do that is going over it with them often and making sure they understand why they’re doing each step. If you would like more information about this, please contact our self defense instructors at Scranton MMA through our website, at ScrantonMMA@gmail.com, or at 570-851-2987.

7 Ways to Reduce Stress in College

As a recent college graduate, you can be assured that I have experience in dealing with the stress that comes with it. Between going to classes, keeping up on homework, balancing internships and finding time for friends, the stress can become overwhelming. Throughout my four years of classes at The University of Scranton, these are the 7 ways I have been able to reduce stress in my own life. I hope you find them helpful!

Go outside.

Classes, internships and jobs can leave you cooped up inside all day. The fluorescent lights and lack of fresh air can make you feel confined and uncomfortable. Try finding time to sit outside throughout the day. Doing homework at a picnic table, studying on a bench or just reclining on an open green can refresh your mind and leave you ready for the next task at hand vent to someone you trust.

It can be a close friend, your mom, or even a professor you feel comfortable with. Sometimes getting things out of your mind and into the air can help you feel better about tackling all the things you have to do this week. It might even help you realize that it’s totally doable and you’re stressing out over nothing!

Eat well

In times of stress we tend to make bad food choices. We turn to caffeine products, sugary sweets, and carb-filled snacks to hold us over until the next meal. Unfortunately, these kinds of foods can you leave you groggy and falling asleep during classes. If hunger hits and you need something quick before class, grab a piece of fruit or string cheese from the POD. These snacks will leave you energized and ready to take on your busy schedule!

Drink WATER!

This goes along with my previous point. A cup or two of coffee is great in the morning to get you going, but the real secret to staying alert and energized is water. When your body is hydrated, it performs at its best and you will be able to think more clearly. Next time you feel drowned in school work, put down the energy drink can and reach for the water!

Take a fitness class

One of the best ways to reduce stress is taking a fitness class. Exercise release happy hormones in your brain that can let you escape your problems even if it’s just for an hour. Exercise can also help you feel more energized and excited to get back to your work AND it’ll help you sleep at night. So, whether it’s dancing, lifting weights, basketball, or kickboxing, get your butt out there and sweat the stress away!

Get enough sleep

We all hear it, and we all refuse to believe it applies to us, but sleep is SO important. Without sleep you can become irritable and sluggish, leaving you feeling too tired to get anything done. It may seem like a good idea to stay up late and get those extra hours of studying in, but that time would be better spent sleeping. Try to get your 6-8 hours per day and schedule your homework for a better time.

Use a planner

Now you might be thinking, “How am I supposed to exercise, sleep enough, AND get all my school work done?” Well, you’ve asked the right person. I am a firm believer in using an agenda, planner, schedule, or whatever you like. I find writing everything in a planner keeps my to-do’s organized in one place and keeps me accountable for finishing them. Crossing off things as I finished them was a surprisingly awesome feeling that motivated to get my work done!

And there you have it. Those are just seven ways you reduce stress throughout your college experience. Keep your mind and body healthy and get organized. You’ll be surprised at how much better you feel after trying just a few of these tactics. Good luck and have a great semester!

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